Mid length prone board sizing

I’m looking at the apple tree mid lengths. What kind of volumes do you guys usually use for your mid lengths. Around 45l for an 85kg? I prone on the 28l board but only when there is no current and in breaks where it breaks mechanically so easy to position. But for more exposed breaks and/or going against current I need something bigger. I have already a 41l apple tree but it’s not quite enough for some conditions.

I have a 50L on order (generally ride a 43L prone board in smaller waves now). I think the idea of these boards is more about the length than the volume. That said volume doesn’t hurt

I’ve gotten to ride a 55l midlength and the extra buoyancy felt like the board was pushing up into your chest instead of being relatively neutral in the water. I’m sure the extra volume is great for winging but it felt like too much for prone.

I have 5 Appletree boards 4-2 30L. 4-10 40L, 5-4 52L and 7-7 107L. All are pro V2 except the 7-7, it’s a DW and I get a ton of waves and combos on it. You adapt to the length and can pump and turn no problem. When there are tons of longboarders and FoilDrivers out, it levels the playing field. Fortunately, the guys going through the lineup on the FoilDrives have pushed the local surf community (Santa Cruz CA) to push for a ban on anything not human powered.

U have a 5,4 profoil? Must be high volume. Have U looked into the skipper prone

I like the shape and bottom of the V2 better than the Skipper. The 5-4 board is 19.5" wide 52L. The 7-7 is a custom DW skipper @ 20.5" wide.

Here I am riding the 7-7: https://youtu.be/sEfpWBtLB9M?si=-kQdL9jJ44EbOX-3&t=205

I’m 190lbs @ 61 years old, volume is my friend :wink:

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Foilface… It’s interesting you point out Foil drives are terrible going through lineups which I agree with and I certainly don’t. However there’s no way I’d foil through that lineup in your clip powered or non powered.

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That video is exactly the riding why foiling will be banned.
Going through groups of surfers really close to them and even dropping in.
Crazy stuff find somewhere quiet :cry:

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Have ridden two midlengths quite a lot - DC crossing 55L 5’5 and Amos Kruzer 40L 5’8 both in stock dimensions. I prefer the kruzer for prone and FD. Length is the key factor with this class of board. Too much thickness is a negative unless very low energy tiny surf. The kruzer is relatively thin and narrow and works wonderfully well in a range of conditions.

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The apple tree DW prone is 43l at 5’0. So it’s quite thick and fat I guess. Is that mainly only good for small waves. And you’re recommending a longer version at a similar literage for larger waves right? Like how big, would you mean like Hawaii overhead to double overhead reef sized waves right?

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Not just for Hawaiian style waves. I found the thicker mid length was for really weak 1-2ft waves and then anything 2ft+ I’d much rather have a thinner longer board. This may be personal preference though and I’m only an average prone rider, at best I can get 3 for 1’s. As far as I’m aware not many are making Kruzer style midlengths which is basically surfboard dimensions, most on offer are scaled down thicker DW style boards. I found the DW board was too much, and I’d often get blasted forward with way too much speed. The Kruzer feels like I’m popping up on a surfboard and it’s all very forgiving and controlled. I’ve gone from having pop-up be the dominant issue with my prone sessions to not even thinking about it, it’s just happening. Plus it’s great on FD. As the box is far forward it feels a lot smaller than 5’8. Some good Dave west / josh ku videos on it

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Do you think you could wing that Kruzer at 40L? I think a big reason people consider/make high vol mid lengths (50L+) is to make it work as a wing board too.

yeah i do, its goes under my feet nicely and easy to balance for deep water tow style start so think it will go well with decent wind

There’s a big difference in volume between your DC and Kruzer, what’s your weight?

85kg. I’ve realised there is so much more to it than volume and IMO squeezing in too much volume is counter productive

That break looks like a dream foil wave. Makes you wonder about the sport of surfing with all those beginners out there riding nothing but chasing some marketed dream.

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Yeah agree but it’s also probably similar just further down with no surfers.
As you prob know beginner/intermediate surfers all congregate together

I don’t know Santa Cruz or California well but I think this is the reality of foiling in the populated areas as long boarders love the same waves as foilers and particularly beginners.

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The reality of prone foiling in California is that you have to share waves with surfers. There is no such thing as finding a place with bad surfing waves and foiling it all by yourself, that is a mythical idea for us. People have been safely and successfully integrating into the lineup at this spot for years but yes this clip did show someone riding through the lineup closer than necessary. The majority chip in on the inside and go for the shoulders only, avoid the middle, and pump back out for the next shoulder.

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Thanks, that’s what I thought. For such a soft day like the clip I don’t even see a problem with having to foil close to stationary surfers. I think it’s much more likely that you get hurt by the beginner long boarders with their 10 ft boards.

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